谷歌自动翻译 》

Microsoft's Xbox One X hits India on Jan. 23 - CNET
The most powerful console will now be sold in one of the world's biggest markets, but will it sink or swim?

Source: CNET News | 23 Jan 2018 | 2:00 am

Caveman caper 'Early Man' is a prehistoric pleasure - CNET
"Wallace and Gromit" creator Aardman takes us to the plasticine Pleistocene age with this joyous stop-motion animation.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 11:31 pm

Great Barrier Reef gets AU$60M in life support - CNET
The money will be split between stopping polluted water entering the reef, culling predatory starfish, coral research and monitoring bleaching events.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 11:20 pm

You spend nearly a whole day each week on the internet - CNET
A report highlights dramatic shifts in online behavior since the internet went mainstream in 2000.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 10:17 pm

Who needs prestige? Netflix ends year on a 'Bright' note - CNET
Oscar noms may be right around the corner, but Netflix is happy to celebrate its brutally reviewed "Bright" as it reports a surge in subscriber growth.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 8:42 pm

Netflix isn't raising prices anytime soon. (Wait, really?) - CNET
Netflix hiked prices last year, but it has no plans for another increase soon -- at least not until circumstances start to look... like they do now. Huh?

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 8:20 pm

Econoboxes found in Edinburgh's abandoned 'robot car park' - Roadshow
Several cars were found preserved in Edinburgh's "robot car park", abandoned for 15 years, as it was being demolished.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 7:39 pm

Net neutrality is bad? 1 million PornHub employees can’t be wrong. Oh, wait.

Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai with his oversized coffee mug in November 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg)

WASHINGTON, DC—If Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai actually allowed the weight of public comments on the FCC's proposed changes to network neutrality regulations to sway (or confirm) his position, he seems to have given more credence to the "opinions" of spam-generating software "bots" than actual citizens, researchers have found.

At the Shmoocon information security conference on Saturday, Leah Figueroa, lead data engineer at the data analytics software company Gravwell, presented a detailed analysis of the public comments submitted to the FCC regarding network neutrality. Applying filters to the over 22 million comments submitted to the FCC, Figueroa and her team attempted to identify which comments were submitted by real US citizens—and which were generated by bulk-uploading bots.

At the end of September, Figueroa said, she and her team pulled in all of the submitted comments from the FCC site and applied a series of analytical steps to separate "organic" comments—those most likely to have been submitted by actual human beings—from comments submitted by automated systems ("bots") using faked personal data.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 7:35 pm

Waymo pits its tech against Atlanta's notoriously tough traffic - Roadshow
Self-driving car firm Waymo expands its testing to the bustling metropolis of Atlanta, Georgia.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 7:30 pm

Trump issues new tariffs on imported washers and solar panels - CNET
Along with Chinese-made solar panels, the announcement singles out Samsung and LG as "substantial causes of serious injury" against US manufacturers.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 7:12 pm

Facebook seeks to redefine time with 'flicks' - CNET
Seconds, minutes and hours won't become obsolete, but the social network giant has a new kind of clock for techies.

Source: CNET News | 22 Jan 2018 | 7:11 pm

Video demonstrates the marvel of CRT displays at 380,000 frames per second

Enlarge (credit: The Slow Mo Guys)

We spend a lot of time reading about the differences between display technologies like LCD and OLED, which, like all display technologies, are built to fool our eyes into seeing things that are only simulated, not real, like colors, or realistic movement. But it helps to see it in action.

A video from YouTube channel The Slow Mo Guys (originally reported on by Motherboard) vividly illustrates how CRT, LCD, and OLED displays work by either zooming in very close or by recording in insane frame rates at ultra slow motion.

You'll still find enthusiasts who insist that it's all been downhill since CRT monitors and TVs went sunset for most of the market. While this video doesn't make much of a case for CRT's relative quality, it does show that they were engineering marvels for their time.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 7:05 pm

Trump puts 30% tariff on imported solar cells and modules

Enlarge / Long Island solar farm. (credit: Brookhaven National Lab)

On Monday afternoon, the Trump administration released a fact sheet (PDF) detailing new tariffs on imports, including a tariff schedule for solar cells and modules starting at 30 percent.

The solar tariff determination had been tensely anticipated by the US solar industry, with manufacturers arguing that cheap imports from Asia have harmed their businesses. Solar installers, financiers, and sales people, however, argue that cheap imports have created a bigger boom in employment than manufacturing ever could.

The news is likely a blow to the wider solar industry, although it's not entirely unexpected. Trump has been vocal about his preference for tariffs and has shown little desire to extend a hand out to the solar industry, which is often seen as a competitor with fossil fuels. When the International Trade Commission (ITC) voted in favor of imposing tariffs on solar imports in September, the trade association Solar Energy Industries of America (SEIA) prepared for the worst.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 6:25 pm

Making tools gives crows a big food boost

Enlarge / A crow gets to work manufacturing a tool. (credit: Jolyon Troscianko)

Tool use among animals isn't common, but it is spread widely across our evolutionary tree. Critters from sea otters to cephalopods have been observed using tools in the wild. In most of these instances, however, the animal is simply using something that's found in its environment, rather than crafting a tool specifically for a task. Tool crafting has mostly been seen among primates.

Mostly, but not entirely. One major exception is the New Caledonian crow. To extract food from holes and crevices, these birds use twigs or stems that are found in their environment without modification. In other environments, however, they'll remove branches from plants and carefully strip parts of the plant to leave behind a hooked stick. The behavior takes over a minute, and the crows will typically carry the tool with them when they explore new sites, and they will sometimes store it for future use.

Understanding how this complex behavior came about in crows requires us to understand the evolutionary advantages that might be had from a good tool. A group of researchers, mostly from the University of St. Andrews, has now done just that: the researchers have quantified how tool manufacture influences food harvesting. The results show that the use of bird-crafted tools can increase food extraction by up to 12 times the rate the crows could achieve by using unmodified sticks.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 6:00 pm

SpaceX gets good news from the Air Force on the Zuma mission

Enlarge / The launch of Zuma was pretty, but the aftermath has been anything but. (credit: SpaceX)

A little more than two weeks have passed since the apparent loss of the highly classified Zuma mission. Since then, SpaceX has publicly and privately stated that its Falcon 9 rocket performed nominally throughout the flight—with both its first and second stages firing as anticipated.

Now, the US Air Force seems to be backing the rocket company up. "Based on the data available, our team did not identify any information that would change SpaceX's Falcon 9 certification status," Lieutenant General John Thompson, commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center, told Bloomberg News. This qualified conclusion came after a preliminary review of data from the Zuma launch. That's according to Thompson, who said the Air Force will continue to review data from all launches.

However tentative, this statement buttresses the efforts by SpaceX to say that, from its perspective, the mission was a success. The statement also adds to the concerns of Northrop Grumman, which built the Zuma payload and the adapter that connected it to the Falcon 9 rocket. Northrop Grumman was also responsible for separating after the second stage of the Zuma rocket reached space. The aerospace veteran has yet to publicly comment on specifics of the Zuma mission since the launch.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 5:29 pm

Sorry, FCC: Montana is enforcing net neutrality with new executive order

Enlarge / Montana Governor Steve Bullock. (credit: Getty Images | William Campbell )

Montana will require Internet service providers to follow net neutrality principles in order to receive state government contracts.

Governor Steve Bullock, a Democrat, today signed an executive order imposing that requirement beginning July 1, 2018.

"There has been a lot of talk around the country about how to respond to the recent decision by Federal Communications Commission to repeal net neutrality rules, which keep the Internet free and open," Bullock said. "It's time to actually do something about it. This is a simple step states can take to preserve and protect net neutrality. We can't wait for folks in Washington, DC, to come to their senses and reinstate these rules."

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 4:40 pm

Windows VR headsets now available with deep discounts

Enlarge / An array of Windows Mixed Reality headsets. (credit: Microsoft)

With its Windows VR headsets, Microsoft wanted to make it simpler and cheaper to get into PC-based virtual reality.

But perhaps not quite this cheap. Most of the Windows VR headsets on the market are now available on Amazon in the US for around 50 percent off; for as little as $200, you can get a headset complete with a pair of motion controllers that will run Windows Mixed Reality software and which has beta quality support for SteamVR titles, too.

When it first announced the products, Microsoft promised its headsets would cost around $300-500, compared to the $600 or more for the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. Since then, both the Rift and the Vive have some big price cuts of their own, and while the Windows VR devices do still retain the pricing edge, the difference is much less pronounced than it once was. For the moment, the Windows hardware retains one advantage—it doesn't need base stations to track movement because all the tracking is handled in the headset itself, which makes installation and setup substantially easier. But this benefit, too, is set to disappear in the near term, as this style of tracking is going to become the norm.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 4:10 pm

A Comcast net neutrality commitment from the NBC merger just expired

(credit: https://arstechnica.com/author/aurich-lawson/)

A commitment made by Comcast to follow net neutrality rules expired on Saturday, seven years after the cable company agreed to the requirements in order to purchase NBCUniversal.

When Comcast bought NBC in 2011, it pledged to follow the net neutrality rules the Federal Communications Commission had passed in 2010 even if those rules were later overturned in court. Comcast thus continued to face rules against blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization even after a federal appeals court struck down that version of net neutrality rules in January 2014. Comcast (but not other ISPs) faced net neutrality requirements for more than a year until June 2015, which is when a new set of net neutrality rules took effect.

But Comcast's merger agreement with the FCC expired, as per schedule, on January 20. The expiration, combined with the FCC's decision last month to repeal the industry-wide net neutrality rules implemented in 2015, will free Comcast of FCC oversight when it comes to net neutrality. Comcast will still face some merger-related oversight from the Department of Justice until September, though.

Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 3:37 pm

An end to in-flight Wi-Fi misery is at hand with Gogo’s 2Ku

Enlarge / You'll know your plane has 2Ku if you see a larger radome on it, like the one pictured above. (credit: Gogo Air)

For this demo, Gogo Air provided a round-trip ticket on Delta Air Lines from DCA>DTW>DCA. I sat in coach and never left Detroit airport before boarding the return leg.

If you're one of those people with the misfortune to follow me on Twitter, you might have noticed the occasional complaint about the poor state of in-flight Internet service. After all, it's incredibly frustrating when you're on a deadline and unable to get any work done because you can't even load the Ars CMS. But there is light at the end of the tunnel, as I discovered late last year. Gogo Air, which provides in-flight connectivity on most of the major US airlines, noticed one of my frustrated outbursts and invited me to try out its latest service, a satellite-based system called 2Ku. Compared to the ATG4 system that most flyers are currently saddled with—including this author right now, currently on AA2617 at 37,000 feet—the difference is night and day.

Gogo Air provides in-flight Internet connectivity to most US passenger airlines (and quite a few international ones) and has been doing so since 2008. Originally, that was with a cellular service called ATG—for Air-To-Ground—which leveraged the old Airfone cellular network. More recently, Gogo Air upgraded that system to ATG4, bumping per-plane bandwidth from 3.1Mbps to 9.8Mbps. (For a much more in-depth look at the state of in-flight Wi-Fi back in the day, check out this comprehensive feature from 2011.)

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 2:13 pm

Amazon Go debuts, and its prying cameras foil our shoplifting attempts

Enlarge / Amazon Go: The bottle. (credit: Sam Machkovech)

SEATTLE—A little more than one year ago, I tried, and failed, to sneak into Amazon Go. The pilot version of Amazon's first grocery store experiment advertised a first in the world of brick-and-mortar shopping: if you want to buy something, just pick it up, toss it in your bag, and walk out. A camera system watches you and uniquely tags every item you pick up, then the store automatically charges a pre-registered credit card for the purchases. No clerks, no check-out aisles.

Amazon's late-2016 announcement of this store was more about building buzz than letting the public in, however. Initially, it was limited only to Amazon employees. Worse, promises that the shop would open for average consumers in "early 2017" didn't come close to fruition, with insiders indicating to Ars that the store's camera-tracking system didn't hold up to larger testing scrutiny as anticipated. But with only 24 hours' notice, that changed on Monday. That same Seattle pilot shop—the one Amazon staffers refused to let us into in December 2016—finally opened its doors to anybody with a smartphone and the Amazon Go app.

Meaning, customers didn't even need an Amazon Prime membership. If you want to stroll into the world's first Amazon Go store, all you need is an Amazon account with valid credit card information and a working smartphone. Turns out, I had both of those, so I walked, bleary-eyed, into the shop shortly after it opened at 7am Pacific time on Monday.

Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Source: Ars Technica | 22 Jan 2018 | 1:00 pm